Linking Emerging Infectious Diseases Research and Policy Networks in Southeast Asia and China: APEIR Phase II

The Asian Partnership on Emerging Infectious Diseases Research (APEIR) is a multi-country, multi-disciplinary and multi-sectoral research network that enables researchers and experts from several sectors, including agriculture and health, to explore joint research and policy questions in animal and public health. The partnership uses an ecohealth approach to address the complexity of emerging infectious diseases. This project presents a new phase of APEIR research on emerging threats from antimicrobial resistance and wildlife trade. It aims to strengthen the field of ecohealth and enhance emerging infectious disease control in Asia through research, capacity building, social and policy advocacy, and stronger knowledge and response networks. The wide use and abuse of antimicrobials as anti-infective drugs and non-therapeutic treatments are key contributors to persistent infections caused by resistance to antimicrobials. This use and abuse is also a major cause of morbidity and mortality around the world. In China and Southeast Asia, the lack of policy or regulation enforcements means that the use of antibiotics is not well-controlled. This research will provide evidence and guidance to develop country-specific and regional strategies to improve the responsible use of antibiotics and to reduce the emergence of resistant infectious agents in China, Indonesia, Laos, Thailand, and Vietnam. Southeast Asia's thriving wildlife trade supports disease transmission to humans. It also threatens livestock, international trade, rural livelihoods, native wildlife populations, and ecosystem health. Little is known about the zoonotic disease risks involved in transmitting diseases between animals and humans. This study will assess the pathogens that circulate and will explore possible pathways of transmission to humans, specifically in China, Laos, Thailand, and Vietnam. It will help prevent emerging zoonotic infectious diseases. It will also decrease wildlife consumption, while educating people about the safe and wise use of wildlife as a source of food protein for poor people. Finally, it will support wildlife diversity and mitigate illegal wildlife trade in the region. Building on past research on avian influenza and ongoing knowledge-translation activities in the health field, this new phase of work will help APEIR build and support regional capacity to communicate and share knowledge to promptly address emerging infectious disease threats.

Projet nᵒ

106915

État du projet

Actif

Date butoir

Friday, novembre 16, 2018

Durée

42 mois

Agent(e) responsable du CRDI

Arlyne Beeche

Financement total

CAD$ 2,411,000

Pays

Chine, Asie du sud, Extrême-Orient

Programme

Food, Environment, and Health

Chargé(e) de projet

PhD, MPH Phuong Trang Huynh

Institution

Health Systems Research Institute

Pays d' institution

Thailand

Site internet

http://eng.moph.go.th/TechResearch/hsri/hsri_web.htm

Chargé(e) de projet

Ridvana D Darmawan

Institution

Center for Indonesian Veterinary Analytical Studies

Pays d' institution

Indonesia

Site internet

http://www.civas.net

Chargé(e) de projet

Professor Fang Jing

Institution

Kunming Medical University as represented by Jiang Runsheng

Pays d' institution

China

Site internet

http://www.kmmu.edu.cn

Chargé(e) de projet

Boualam khamlome

Institution

Lao People's Democratic Republic. Ministry of Health

Pays d' institution

Laos

Chargé(e) de projet

Suwit Chotinun

Institution

Chiang Mai University

Pays d' institution

Thailand

Site internet

http://www.chiangmai.ac.th

Chargé(e) de projet

Dr. Nguyen Viet Khong

Institution

National Institute for Veterinary Research of the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development

Pays d' institution

Viet Nam

Chargé(e) de projet

Witthawat Wiriyarat

Institution

Mahidol University

Pays d' institution

Thailand

Site internet

http://www.mahidol.ac.th/mahidol.html