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Inland Aquaculture and Adaptation to Climate Change in Northern Thailand

Aquaculture currently contributes almost half of the aquatic animals consumed by humans, and this percentage is expected to grow. A large fraction of global aquaculture production takes place in the tropics and subtropics of Asia, serving as an important source of employment and food security for rural residents. However, research on climate change and aquaculture is limited compared to many other agricultural activities. This project focuses on tilapia grown in farm ponds or floating cages in rivers and reservoirs in northern Thailand. It explores both how aquaculture practices should adapt to changing climatic conditions and the value of aquaculture as an adaptation strategy. Researchers will explore past impacts and future risks of floods and droughts on farms using different risk-management practices. They will look at the effects of climate variability on water properties and tilapia production, and use models to build scenarios to assess future risks from floods and low-flow episodes due to climate change. Researchers will also focus on aquaculture as an adaptation strategy, identifying and measuring the contributions of aquaculture to the resilience of households. Findings will be used by different stakeholders to assess adaptation options for fish aquaculture and create pilot adaptation projects. By combining the practical experience of water managers and fish farmers with research, recommendations can be developed for the water and fisheries sectors in northern Thailand and other aquaculture areas in Asia. This project is funded through IDRC's Adaptation Research Initiative in Asia (ARI-Asia) with funds from the Government of Canada's fast-start financing.

Project ID
107087
Project Status
Completed
End Date
Duration
36 months
IDRC Officer
Charlotte MacAlister
Total Funding
CA$ 1,234,000.00
Location
Thailand
Programs
Climate Change
Institution Country
Thailand
Project Leader
Dr. Louis Lebel
Institution
Chiang Mai University