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Technology and Innovation
Leveraging science and innovation for development

Science, technology, and innovation (STI) can drive economic growth, help solve social and environmental problems, and reduce poverty.

All countries need to develop the capacity to produce and use science and technology themselves, and adapt knowledge to their needs and contexts.

Societies also need to understand both the benefits and risks of emerging technologies, such as digital ones, in order to maximize their benefits.

IDRC’s Technology and Innovation program supports research and capacity building to help developing countries produce, adapt, and use STI for development.

Along with gender, key cross-cutting themes within the program are intellectual property rights, science granting councils, and inclusiveness.
 

African Institute for Mathematical Sciences

​IDRC is implementing Canada’s $20 million contribution to expand the network of Institutes for Mathematical Sciences in Africa, which provides rigorous mathematics training to post-graduate African students.

IDRC Challenge Fund

This initiative partners with Canada’s science granting councils to support joint research by Canadian and Southern scientists in areas of shared interest, such as climate change and infectious disease.

Information and Networks

This program explores the positive and negative impacts of widespread access to mobile telephones and the Internet in developing countries. I&N works to promote positive social and economic change, particularly in the areas of creative industries, governance, learning, and science.
 
 

Latest Results

Two recently published open access books present the findings of IDRC-funded research exploring the impact of information and communication technologies (ICTs) in developing countries. These books provide important insights into the increasingly...
New books highlight diverse ways ICTs contribute to developmentInformation Lives of the Poor: Fighting poverty with technologyMathematical modelling informs HIV prevention policy in ChinaFlexible intellectual property rights lead to greater innovation in Africa Investing in Internet access boosts incomes, concludes Latin American study

Latest Results

A robust network of researchers in Africa, Asia, and Latin America has delved down to the household level to better understand the changes brought about by increased access to information and communication technologies (ICTs) in the developing...
New books highlight diverse ways ICTs contribute to development Information Lives of the Poor: Fighting poverty with technologyMathematical modelling informs HIV prevention policy in ChinaFlexible intellectual property rights lead to greater innovation in Africa Investing in Internet access boosts incomes, concludes Latin American study

Latest Results

IDRC-funded research is using mathematical modelling to influence local and national policies in China to reduce HIV transmission.    Treatment as prevention Earlier research conducted under Modelling and controlling infectious diseases project...
New books highlight diverse ways ICTs contribute to developmentInformation Lives of the Poor: Fighting poverty with technology Mathematical modelling informs HIV prevention policy in ChinaFlexible intellectual property rights lead to greater innovation in Africa Investing in Internet access boosts incomes, concludes Latin American study

Latest Results

Research in Africa has shown that flexible intellectual property policies can lead to greater innovation and development.  The Open African Innovation Research and Training (Open A.I.R.) research project investigated the unique collaborative...
New books highlight diverse ways ICTs contribute to developmentInformation Lives of the Poor: Fighting poverty with technologyMathematical modelling informs HIV prevention policy in China Flexible intellectual property rights lead to greater innovation in Africa Investing in Internet access boosts incomes, concludes Latin American study

Latest Results

High-speed Internet access, or broadband, can effectively contribute to economic and social development, but only when it is combined with investments in human capital, such as teacher training and digital literacy programs for women, according to a...
New books highlight diverse ways ICTs contribute to developmentInformation Lives of the Poor: Fighting poverty with technologyMathematical modelling informs HIV prevention policy in ChinaFlexible intellectual property rights lead to greater innovation in Africa Investing in Internet access boosts incomes, concludes Latin American study
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