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Thierry Zomahoun

Thierry Zomahoun

Executive Director, AIMS Next Einstein Initiative

 
Thierry Zomahoun became Executive Director of the African Institute for Mathematical Sciences Next Einstein Initiative in August 2011. He has three master’s degrees, including an Executive MBA from McGill University, and has held leadership positions at several Canadian international development organizations.
 
"I strongly believe that the key to wealth creation in Africa is education. However, the traditional way of teaching math and science has alienated generations of young Africans. So when I learned what AIMS was doing, I fell in love with its approach. We don’t teach students what to think, but enable them to solve problems by themselves.                                                
 
The support we’ve received from Canada has enabled us to tap into major future funding. When other donors see the partnership between AIMS and the Government of Canada through IDRC, they are reassured that something serious is going on here in the area of innovative math and science education in Africa.
 
AIMS is positively affecting education in Africa. Universities are learning from its methods, and a recent UNESCO award recognized AIMS’ innovative teacher training. Our centre in Cape Town has trained almost 1,000 teachers in the AIMS approach. AIMS is a transformational experience, with every student getting a world-class education on a full scholarship."
 
Learn more about AIMS from Naser Faruqui's presentation at IDRC's annual public meeting and article in Embassy newsweekly.

Latest Results

Research shows that an integrated approach to dengue control—focusing on ecological, biological, and social factors—can reduce vector densities while empowering communities to tackle the conditions that put them at risk. Dengue is a worldwide public...
Involving urban communities in controlling dengue fever in Latin AmericaHelping communities control <i>leishmaniasis</i> in rural TunisiaPreventing Chagas in Central America through simple home improvementsAdapting to climate change in Malawi by improving soils and nutritionReducing liver fluke transmission in northeastern Thailand

Latest Results

As climate change and irrigation pressures mount in rural Tunisia, a multi-faceted research effort is giving rural communities the knowledge and tools to stem a growing tide of infection. Zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis (ZCL) is on the move. This...
Involving urban communities in controlling dengue fever in Latin America Helping communities control <i>leishmaniasis</i> in rural TunisiaPreventing Chagas in Central America through simple home improvementsAdapting to climate change in Malawi by improving soils and nutritionReducing liver fluke transmission in northeastern Thailand

Latest Results

Research in El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras confirms that low cost and locally sustainable home improvements provide a sustainable means of controlling the spread of Chagas disease.It begins with mild symptoms—typically aches, fever, and...
Involving urban communities in controlling dengue fever in Latin AmericaHelping communities control <i>leishmaniasis</i> in rural Tunisia Preventing Chagas in Central America through simple home improvementsAdapting to climate change in Malawi by improving soils and nutritionReducing liver fluke transmission in northeastern Thailand

Latest Results

Ongoing research in Malawi shows that agro-ecological farming strategies—especially intercropping with legumes—bring many benefits in the context of climate change: healthier soils, improved nutrition, and more resilient farming systems. According...
Involving urban communities in controlling dengue fever in Latin AmericaHelping communities control <i>leishmaniasis</i> in rural TunisiaPreventing Chagas in Central America through simple home improvements Adapting to climate change in Malawi by improving soils and nutritionReducing liver fluke transmission in northeastern Thailand

Latest Results

A new model tested in northeastern Thailand shows that a multi-pronged approach—combining treatment, ecosystem monitoring, and community mobilization—can effectively tackle the transmission of liver flukes. Raw fish with spiced salad—koi pla—is a...
Involving urban communities in controlling dengue fever in Latin AmericaHelping communities control <i>leishmaniasis</i> in rural TunisiaPreventing Chagas in Central America through simple home improvementsAdapting to climate change in Malawi by improving soils and nutrition Reducing liver fluke transmission in northeastern Thailand
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IDRC funds researchers in the developing world so they can build healthier, more prosperous societies
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