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Thierry Zomahoun

Thierry Zomahoun

Executive Director, AIMS Next Einstein Initiative

 
Thierry Zomahoun became Executive Director of the African Institute for Mathematical Sciences Next Einstein Initiative in August 2011. He has three master’s degrees, including an Executive MBA from McGill University, and has held leadership positions at several Canadian international development organizations.
 
"I strongly believe that the key to wealth creation in Africa is education. However, the traditional way of teaching math and science has alienated generations of young Africans. So when I learned what AIMS was doing, I fell in love with its approach. We don’t teach students what to think, but enable them to solve problems by themselves.                                                
 
The support we’ve received from Canada has enabled us to tap into major future funding. When other donors see the partnership between AIMS and the Government of Canada through IDRC, they are reassured that something serious is going on here in the area of innovative math and science education in Africa.
 
AIMS is positively affecting education in Africa. Universities are learning from its methods, and a recent UNESCO award recognized AIMS’ innovative teacher training. Our centre in Cape Town has trained almost 1,000 teachers in the AIMS approach. AIMS is a transformational experience, with every student getting a world-class education on a full scholarship."
 
Learn more about AIMS from Naser Faruqui's presentation at IDRC's annual public meeting and article in Embassy newsweekly.

Latest Results

​In much of Sub-Saharan Africa, cattle herders and farmers have traditionally relied on the knowledge shared by their elders to determine when to plant their crops or sell livestock. However, their livelihoods are being negatively impacted...
Uganda: Improving livelihoods with weather dataSenegal: Staying home at all costsAngola: Better forecastingMorocco: The value of waterIndia: When cities expand too rapidly

Latest Results

​When a neighbourhood is at risk of flooding, the most logical solution is to build new houses in more secure areas and to relocate the residents. But in Dakar, the capital of Senegal, things are not so simple. The Sahel region experienced a long...
Uganda: Improving livelihoods with weather data Senegal: Staying home at all costsAngola: Better forecastingMorocco: The value of waterIndia: When cities expand too rapidly

Latest Results

​Angola once benefited from a rich climatological database. But 30 years of civil war, which lasted from 1973 to 2002, destroyed 98% of the country's meteorological stations and the associated data. The war also forced a large number of families...
Uganda: Improving livelihoods with weather dataSenegal: Staying home at all costs Angola: Better forecastingMorocco: The value of waterIndia: When cities expand too rapidly

Latest Results

​Morocco is a partially arid country where rain is rare but where agriculture prospers in spite of everything. Climate change has nevertheless had a major impact on Morocco in recent years. Precipitation has decreased by 20%, and heat and cold waves...
Uganda: Improving livelihoods with weather dataSenegal: Staying home at all costsAngola: Better forecasting Morocco: The value of waterIndia: When cities expand too rapidly

Latest Results

With more than 1.2 billion inhabitants, the population of India is continually growing, and it’s transforming the country as a result. “The climate is not the only thing changing here. Everything changes!” says Veena Srinivasan, socio-hydrologist at...
Uganda: Improving livelihoods with weather dataSenegal: Staying home at all costsAngola: Better forecastingMorocco: The value of water India: When cities expand too rapidly
Detailed Researcher Profile
Knowledge, innovation, and solutions to improve the lives of people in the developing world
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