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Unsolicited concept notes
 
The process for submitting proposals to IDRC is lengthy and thorough. It generally includes the steps below.  Please note that because of limited funding, we are not able to fund all interesting ideas.
 
1. Share our vision
Before approaching us, we recommend that you familiarize yourself with our approach and priorities. You can do this by reviewing our website or reading our Strategic Plan 2015-2020.
 
2. Propose your idea as a concept note
Have a great research idea you want to pursue? First, contact the relevant program officer who can advise you about regional and thematic priorities. Please consult our Programs page to see a list of programs and program staff. Starting a dialogue early on will help to ensure closeness of fit between your area of interest and IDRC’s program priorities.
  
Research ideas are not project proposals. They are short concept notes of about 800 words that must address the following questions: 
 
1. What is the problem for which you are seeking funding?
2. Why is it important?
3. What are the main objectives for your proposed activity?
4. How will your objectives be achieved?
5. What are the expected outputs?
6. What is the proposed timeline?
7. What is the approximate budget?
8. How can we contact you?
 
3. Send us your idea
Once you are confident your idea fits within one of our Program's research funding priorities and you have answered the questions above, email your concept note to the appropriate Program.
We will acknowledge the receipt of your concept note by email. All concept notes we receive are reviewed by the scientific and technical staff that make up our Program team. Reviews are normally done on a quarterly or semi-annual basis so it may take some time before you know if your idea has been accepted or rejected. We will inform you of the outcome regardless whether we choose to pursue your idea or not.

If your idea is accepted one of our Program staff will contact you to discuss developing a more comprehensive project proposal.

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