français
Home > IDRC > Funding > Guides and Forms
Guides and Forms
Whether you’re a research grant applicant, successful grantee, or fellowships and awards applicant or supplier, there are guidelines, brochures, information packages, and forms specific to your needs. You’ll find them below.
 
To apply for funding 

Before you propose a research idea, consult the following forms and documents. Different IDRC programs may also have specific requirements and forms, which you’ll find on the program page, under Approach.
  • Research grant idea (Word) (PDF)
  • Application for an IDRC research grant (Word) (PDF)
Projects 

Consultancies

Travel
Banking information
For fellowships and awards

To apply for an IDRC fellowship or award, check out our competitions page. 

If you receive an award, you will also need to provide reports on your activities:
  • guidelines for field research reports 
  • award recipient’s final report form
  • science journalism award recipient’s final report form

Latest Results

Research shows that an integrated approach to dengue control—focusing on ecological, biological, and social factors—can reduce vector densities while empowering communities to tackle the conditions that put them at risk. Dengue is a worldwide public...
Involving urban communities in controlling dengue fever in Latin AmericaHelping communities control <i>leishmaniasis</i> in rural TunisiaPreventing Chagas in Central America through simple home improvementsAdapting to climate change in Malawi by improving soils and nutritionReducing global mercury emissions in artisanal and small-scale gold mining

Latest Results

As climate change and irrigation pressures mount in rural Tunisia, a multi-faceted research effort is giving rural communities the knowledge and tools to stem a growing tide of infection. Zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis (ZCL) is on the move. This...
Involving urban communities in controlling dengue fever in Latin America Helping communities control <i>leishmaniasis</i> in rural TunisiaPreventing Chagas in Central America through simple home improvementsAdapting to climate change in Malawi by improving soils and nutritionReducing global mercury emissions in artisanal and small-scale gold mining

Latest Results

Research in El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras confirms that low cost and locally sustainable home improvements provide a sustainable means of controlling the spread of Chagas disease.It begins with mild symptoms—typically aches, fever, and...
Involving urban communities in controlling dengue fever in Latin AmericaHelping communities control <i>leishmaniasis</i> in rural Tunisia Preventing Chagas in Central America through simple home improvementsAdapting to climate change in Malawi by improving soils and nutritionReducing global mercury emissions in artisanal and small-scale gold mining

Latest Results

Ongoing research in Malawi shows that agro-ecological farming strategies—especially intercropping with legumes—bring many benefits in the context of climate change: healthier soils, improved nutrition, and more resilient farming systems. According...
Involving urban communities in controlling dengue fever in Latin AmericaHelping communities control <i>leishmaniasis</i> in rural TunisiaPreventing Chagas in Central America through simple home improvements Adapting to climate change in Malawi by improving soils and nutritionReducing global mercury emissions in artisanal and small-scale gold mining

Latest Results

Artisanal and small-scale gold mining (ASGM) is the largest source of human-caused mercury emissions, surpassing even coal-burning. With more than 15 million small-scale gold miners operating in more than 70 countries today, finding a way to reduce...
Involving urban communities in controlling dengue fever in Latin AmericaHelping communities control <i>leishmaniasis</i> in rural TunisiaPreventing Chagas in Central America through simple home improvementsAdapting to climate change in Malawi by improving soils and nutrition Reducing global mercury emissions in artisanal and small-scale gold mining
Guides and Forms
IDRC funds researchers in the developing world so they can build healthier, more prosperous societies
Bookmark and Share
Flickr YouTube Facebook Twitter